Days of wine and roses

So, even though this blog is about classic country music memories, at least part of it is just my memories.  Oh, it's gonna be about a lot of various and sundry things.  Since one of those things is my memories of Nashville, I want to share about a book I just finished on Audible, A Murder in Music City.  I got the idea that if I ever want to make a Wiki about a subject, this would be a good one.  I want a source that has pictures of all the people I've been researching this week.  The book is about Paula Herring, a college freshman who came home to Nashville one weekend only to be brutally murdered in her own home on a cold Saturday night in 1964.

Being a native Nashvillian, I enjoyed all the references to places that I pass on a regular basis and some that are gone.  I don't remember some of the businesses mentioned on West End and Broadway, but I do know those roads and intersections quite well.  The victim's mother and several others in the book worked at Vanderbilt, just like I do.  I wanted to find some of the spellings of the names, because some of them were pronounced a little differently than we say them here.  Like the former Davidson County Public Defender Charles Galbreath.  The narrator pronounces it "Gall-breeth," whereas we natives say that name "Gal-breath" (just like it looks, like the two words it breaks down into, with the emphasis on GAL and breath sliding in at the end, almost like "bruhth.").  That's the most memorable odd pronunciation.  There are others scattered throughout, but none too glaring that just grate on the nerves of us lifers here.  I knew very little about the case.  The house is still there; I drove past it today.  It's not far from where I went to my doctor appointment today.

I'm a pretty decent amateur detective.  I think it comes from a career as a nuclear medicine technologist, a photographer that looks at people's inside, a sleuth that finds reasons for what's wrong with that patient.  It's tricky - at this point in time, I kind of feel like I'm giving the patient's doctors too much information sometimes - but as an amateur, I can enjoy solving old mysteries and mainly, learning interesting forgotten history and sharing it with others. That said, I can appreciate what this author was going through when he started working on this story.  He had not grown up here so his memories of Nashville weren't quite as long as mine, but I do remember what research was like back then.  It is far easier now for people to find information than it was then.  I have a lot of memorabilia from my quests for information about Don Rich.  Now you can find almost anything you want about him.  Need to buy a bottle of Don's DNA?  Here's a link. (Just kidding. But I bet you can easily learn his social security number.)

Well, bedtime has come faster than I expected.  Good night.

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